• Diagnostic Psychological Assessments
  • ADHD Screening
  • Learning Disability Assessment – Adults (e.g., accommodations for college students)
  • Dementia Screening
  • Neuropsychological Screening
  • Traumatic Brain Injury
  • Intelligence Testing
  • Memory Testing
  • Achievement Testing
  • Personality Assessment
  • General Psychopathology Assessment
  • Vocational Interest Screening

Diagnostic Psychological Evaluation involves the integration of available records; an in-depth, face-to-face clinical interview; and psychometric testing unavailable through most other sources.  These data points are combined to assign (or rule-out) a diagnosis from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders – Fifth Edition (DSM-5).  Summaries and recommendations are offered that are relevant to the referral question.

ADHD Screening involves the integration of available records; an in-depth, face-to-face clinical interview with parent(s) and child; telephone interview with the child’s teacher; and psychometric testing unavailable through most other sources. These data points are combined to assign (or rule-out) a diagnosis of ADHD. Summaries and recommendations are offered that are relevant to the referral question.

Learning Disability Assessment involves the integration of available records; an in-depth, face-to-face clinical interview; and psychometric testing unavailable through most other sources. If the assessment is of a child, the evaluation will include interview(s) with parent(s), and telephone interview(s) with the child’s teacher. These data points are combined to assign (or rule-out) a diagnosis of Learning Disability. Summaries and recommendations are offered that are relevant to the referral question.

Neuropsychological Screening and Dementia Screening involves assessment of cognitive and behavioral functions using standardized tests and procedures.  Cognitive testing might include: Intelligence; mental status; problem solving; perseveration/rumination; abstract reasoning; decision making; and conceptualization. 

Psychological testing might include: Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test (RAVLT); Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST); Rey Complex Figure Test; Controlled Oral Word Association Test; Trailmaking Test; Iowa Gambling Task – Version 2; Dementia Rating Scale 2 (DRS-2); Boston Diagnostic Aphasia Examination.

Question: Can neuropsychological testing help detect Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)?

Answer: Yes. In fact, sometimes neuropsychological testing is the ONLY way to detect Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI). In the time following a suspected head injury, the person will often receive a CT scan or MRI, the MRI being the more ‘sensitive’ of the two scans. However, because the injury to the brain might be microscopic, even MRI will be powerless to detect legitimate injuries in a patient with TBI. (See https://www.asnr.org/patientinfo/conditions/tbi.shtml.) Neuropsychological testing, therefore, is used to detect significant changes in the person’s cognitive and behavioral functioning. Gale Forensic Psychology offers neuropsychological testing unavailable through most other sources.

Intelligence Testing includes psychological evaluation of general intellectual ability (IQ), as well as, clusters of abilities including verbal comprehension, perceptual reasoning, working memory and processing speed.  The Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale – IV (WAIS-IV) is the most commonly used and accepted psychological test of intellectual ability. Another commonly used test is the Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence – II (WASI-II), a brief measure of intellectual ability.

Memory Testing involves a brief psychological examination of mental status, followed by a systematic review of various components of memory including Auditory Memory, Visual Memory, Visual Working Memory, Immediate and Delayed memory, and Overall Retention of Information.  The most commonly used and accepted psychological tests of memory include:  the Wechsler Memory Scales – IV (WMS-IV); the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test (RAVLT); the California Verbal Learning Test (CVLT); and the Rey Complex Figure Test and Recognition Trial (RCFT).

Achievement Testing includes the comprehensive psychological examination of Oral Expression, Listening Comprehension, Written Expression, Basic Reading Skills, Reading Comprehension, Reading Fluency, Math Calculation Skills, and Math Reasoning.  The most commonly used and accepted psychological measures of achievement include: the Woodcock-Johnson Tests of Achievement – III (WJ III ACH) and the Wide Range Achievement Test – 4 (WRAT-4).

General Psychopathology Assessment and Personality Assessment includes psychological examination of various clinical areas such as:  pain and bodily (somatic) complaints; anxiety; depression; suicidal thoughts; emotional problems; behavior problems; disordered thinking; mania;  paranoia; psychosis; drug and alcohol problems; borderline traits; antisocial traits; narcissistic traits; aggression; violence; criminal thinking; dominance; stress; warmth; strengths; coping strategies; and treatment barriers/treatment amenability. 

Psychological tests frequently include one or more of the following instruments:  the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory – 2 (MMPI-2); the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory – 2 – Restructured Form (MMPI-2 RF); the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI); the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory – III (MCMI-III); and the Symptom Checklist – 90 – R (SCL-90-R).Vocational Interest Screening involves measuring a person’s career path through personality, preferences and work values. Some popular vocational screens include: Strengths Quest; Self-Directed Search; Career Decision Scale; and the Vocational Preference Inventory.